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Hasselblad Foundation
office & library
Ekmansgatan 8
SE 41256 Gothenburg
Sweden
+46 31 7782150


Hasselblad Center
exhibition hall
Götaplatsen
+46 31 7782150

Large Research Grants Awarded 1996 -2000

 

2000 - Universeum received SEK 6 million to support teaching and research in the natural sciences.

In 2000, a grant of SEK 6 million was made to support teaching and research in the natural sciences at Universeum – Sweden’s national science discovery center - in Göteborg, for establishment of facilities and activities to increase the interest of children and young people in technology and the natural sciences. The center opened in June 2001. This grant was a contribution to the project costs for a number of experimental stations, constructed in consultation with Chalmers University of Technology (http://www.universeum.se).


Universeum, Göteborg
Photo: Universeum
Comments from the recipient

In the department called “Kalejdo” (“Calaido”) the theme "Space" was built with an appreciated "space walk" . This is a dark, star-covered room where you walk among the planets in our solar system and can explore their different attributes. The" moon jump" illustrates gravitation. Another theme in Kalejdo is "Microcosm" with molecules, atoms and all the different particles atoms consist of. Interactive stations show the four basic forces in universe, a one-armed bandit illustrates how three quarks can create particles with different probabilities, inter-active computers explain the building of elements and giant hydrogen, oxygen and carbon atoms are suspended from the ceiling. Nobel prizewinners in physics, chemistry and medicine are portrayed on the walls.


In the department “Explora”, an " inventors’ corner" was built. It deals with air related experiments and visitors can also make their own "inventions" and test them in the air flow machine.

 

1999 - Stockholm University received SEK 6 million to establish a mass spectrometry facility for biological and chemical research in "proteomics work".

In 1999, a grant of SEK 6 million was made to Stockholm University to establish a mass spectrometry facility for biological and chemical research in "proteomics work". This type of research elucidates the structure and function of our cells by identifying and characterizing proteins acting in functionally interesting situations (http://www.su.se).


This micrograph shows a tumor
cell grown in culture. It has been
stained to visualize a system of
protein polymers called micro-
filaments, which generates force
for cell movements and migration.
Hundreds of proteins participate in
the activity of this system, which
is subject of investigation at the
Department of Cell Biology,
The Wenner-Gren Institute at
Stockholm Universtity.
Masspectrometry is used to
identify the proteins involed in
the formation of these protein
polymers and their interactions
Photo: Louise Bertilson.
Comments from the recipient

A grant of SEK 6 million to establish Stockholm University Proteomics Facility (SUPF) for proteomics. This facility is used for research concerning the structure and function of our cells, where identification and characterization of proteins is a central theme. SUPF is run as a consortium of researchers from the chemistry and biology sections of the Natural Science Faculty. A large number of research groups representing cell biology, microbiology, biochemistry/biophysics, neurochemistry, physiological botany, and animal cell physiology are involved, and . many scientists, postdoctoral fellows and graduate students from all these disciplines have studied mass spectrometry at SUPF. Research projects concerning the structure and function of the chloroplast membranes, proteins involved in the force generating systems of eukaryotic cells, signal transduction in Drosophila and in nerve cells are examples of areas under investigation. For the last year, SUPF has been incorporated into the Department of Analytical Chemistry, where there is a considerable knowledge base in the operation of mass spectrometers.

 

1998 - The Technical University of Denmark received SEK 6 million for the establishment of a research center: the Center for Biomembrane Physics.

In 1998, a grant of SEK 6 million was made to the Technical University of Denmark for the establishment of a research center: the Center for Biomembrane Physics. The purpose of the center is to expand on theoretical and experimental research into the physical chemistry of biological membranes (http://www.dtu.dk).

Comments from the recipient

The center has conducted fundamental and applied research within self-organized amphiphilic structures, lipid monolayers, bilayers and biological membranes, in addition to interactions of these systems with enzymes, proteins, peptides, drugs, cholesterol, as well as other organic substances. The emphasis, experimentally as well as theoretically, has been on developing a molecular description of the physical properties of soft interfaces and membranes, and investigating how these properties may control membrane function. The Center has been engaged in the training of young researchers and has been the focal point of an intensive national as well as international research program.


Molecular Dynamics simulation of a water channel embedded in a lipid membrane.
The calculations led to a determination of the capacity of the channel molecule
for transporting water through the membrane. [Courtesy of Dr. Morten Ø. Jensen.]

 

1997 - Åbo Academy, Finland received SEK 6 million for the visualization of biological signal processes in respect of molecules, cells and tissues with the aid of three and four-dimensional computer techniques.

In 1997, a grant of SEK 6 million was made to Åbo Academy, Finland for the visualization of biological signal processes in respect of molecules, cells and tissues with the aid of three and four-dimensional computer techniques. Insight into these signal processes is vital to the understanding of various normal and morbid tissue processes, and for the development of therapies to treat associated illnesses (http://www.abo.fi).

 

1996 - University of Bergen, Norway received SEK 5 million to facilitate the development of a remote-controlled submarine with land-based equipment.

In 1996, a grant of SEK 5 million was made to the University of Bergen, Norway to facilitate the development of a remote-controlled submarine with land-based equipment for analysis, image processing and photographic documentation associated with the study of marine life in deep waters. The submarine has been very successful, and is also available to guest researchers in the marine sciences (http:/www.uib.no).

Comments from the recipient

The remotely operated vehicle (ROV) Aglantha has been in use since 1998, operated down to depths of almost 2000 meters in Norwegian fjords, coastal waters and open sea, for example along the Midatlantic Ridge between Iceland and the Azores. The vehicle is equipped with high-resolution video systems, instruments for environmental monitoring, and sampling devices.


ROV Aglantha

This advanced research facility has been of the utmost importance for studies of deep-water corals, vertical distribution of pelagic organisms and distribution patterns of benthic macro-organisms. It has also proven to be an excellent method for collecting intact animals from great depths for further experimental studies. Through the use of red light, invisible to most marine organisms, the scientists have been able to study the natural behaviour of animals at great depths. Several new species of marine animals have been observed on the video recordings, but there is still a need to collect specimens directly for precise identification. ROV Aglantha has been a very important factor in the success of deep-sea research in Norway.

 

1996 - The Hasselblad Laboratory – A donation of SEK 20 million was made to University of Gothenburg to build the Hasselblad Laboratory at Medicinareberget, on the campus of the Medical School of University of Gothenburg.

In 1996, a donation of SEK 20 million was made to Göteborg University to build the Hasselblad Laboratory at Medicinareberget, on the campus of the Medical School of Göteborg University. The laboratory houses an NMR center, Scandinavia's most high-powered facilities for the analysis of complex molecular structures.


The Hasselblad Laboratory at
Medicinareberget.
Comments from the recipient

NMR-spectroscopy is a routine analytical tool used in several research disciplines, ranging from petroleum and organic chemistry to metabolite studies in pharmacology and physiological applications. NMR techniques are also used to determine 3-dimensional pictures of biological macromolecules at an atomic level, as well as in the study of short-lived protein complexes, protein-ligand interactions in drug development, and dynamic processes within a protein.
A donation of 20 million kronor to Göteborg University made it possible to establish the Hasselblad laboratory at Medicinareberget in Göteborg. The laboratory houses the Swedish NMR Centre, one of the best equipped laboratories in the world for these purposes, with NMR spectrometers in the range between 500 MHz and 900 MHz. The research in the laboratory is focused on the study of membrane proteins, a class of proteins central to signal transduction between living cells and to the cellular energy system.